Madagascar’s love affair with the 2CV

Feno RafamomejamlsoaImage copyright Empics

Citroen’s 2CV cars tend to be associated with rural France. But for decades it has been the car of choice for taxi drivers more than 5,000 miles (8,000km) away on the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar.

Feno Rafamomejamlsoa

Feno Rafamomejamlsoa’s father had a 2CV which he bought in 1964. When that broke down, Feno decided to get one of his own. That was in 1987 and he still has it today.

2CVs

Madagascar gained independence from France in 1960, but French cars remain extremely popular.

2CV in front of palace

French influence is also seen outside the presidential palace.

Souvenir car

2CVs have become a symbol of Madagascar.

Souvenir car

Eddy Rajaonarison La Roche, 26, has been making these souvenirs out of milk cartons since he was 10. It takes him three days to make one.

Taxi

You wait ages for a 2CV and then four come along at once.

Menjasoa Anjarawaina

Menjasoa Anjarawaina used to drive another vintage French car – a Renault 4 – but he switched to a 2CV three years ago because he said they were cheaper to maintain.

Taxi

People often choose 2CVs because they don’t often break down and when they do, they are cheap and easy to repair.

Many Andrianaivoson

Many Andrianaivoson used to have another car but also switched to a 2CV four months ago because the spare parts are cheaper.

Road

There is one complaint – the 2CV can’t go that fast. But on the capital Antananarivo’s congested roads this doesn’t really matter.

2CV

With such old cars, passengers often find the seats are a bit worse for wear.

Taxi driver

For some the 2CV is a car for life.

All photographs taken by Clare Spencer.

We’d like to see your pictures of 2CVs and possibly publish our favourites. Send your 2CV pics that you are particularly proud of to yourpics@bbc.co.uk. You can send an MMS from the UK to 61124. Or if you are contacting us from the rest of the world send it to: +44 (0)7725 100 100. Or upload your photos and video here.

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